food review: CHOWKING’s ORANGE CHICKEN

Chowking's Orange Chicken

One meal included in Chowking restaurant’s menu caught my attention if it really taste good as a food combination.  So, as a certified foodie… I have to try it out!

In one of their restaurant branches, I ordered their “Orange Chicken rice Meal with drink” for one person. They gave me a number in the counter and ask me to wait for it for some few minutes. Well, while waiting for my order… I just observe how their crews move and accommodate their customers. I can say that they were courteous yet fully occupied with some task. Finally, my order was served after 16 minutes of waiting. It’s quite a long wait but excusable because the food was served hot enough to be eaten and with a little apology plus a smile from the service crew who brought me my order. Aside from the fact, that I can see that the lines on their counter were longer and that there’s still many arriving customers.

Here’s my verdict for the food, I didn’t expect that a combination of the light sweetness and slight sourness of the orange taste well with the chicken. The chicken is rightly cooked and tender enough to be chewed. Although, the meal was served with few slices of the chicken meat. But, the sauce in the “Orange Chicken” compliments the chicken meat and the orange carpels and it really tastes good. I have to admit that my taste buds loved it. Moreover, it fits to be a viand on plain rice or even on fried rice… knowing that Filipinos cannot have a complete meal without rice. I’m happy that I’ve tried tasting it. Yup, why would “Chowking” include it on their menu if it’s not yummy. I should say that they’ve added an asset meal on their menu.

All I can say is that, if pineapple goes well with chicken in “Pininyahang Manok“, why not an orange with chicken!

Photo by: Sukito San

food recipe: EASY STEAMED LAPU-LAPU

We traditionally avoid eating meat during Holy Week specifically the Catholics. Basically, there’s no other choice what to serve on the table other than vegetables or fish dishes. This lent I’ve tried an easy “steamed lapu-lapu” recipe of my mom.

For the ingredients: Lapu-Lapu fish, rock salt, onion, ginger and water for steaming.

For the procedure: First, you have to clean the fish. Second, rub the whole fish with rock salt. Then, insert sliced ginger and onion inside the fish head to help reduce the fishy smell. Last, steam the fish in the steamer for 30 minutes or until cooked. Chill for a while then sprinkle it with sliced onions and ginger on top… and serve.

food recipe: Mardi Gras’ DARK PORK ADOBO

Fat Tuesday or “Mardi Gras” is usually celebrated in European countries. This festival simply means eating all the meat and fats literally on the day before “Ash Wednesday” which is Tuesday… so they call it as Fat Tuesday. “Ash Wednesday” is the start of the Lenten Season that requires the practice of abstinence or avoiding meat consumption most especially among Catholics. So, I have here my own simple version of “Adobo” which is “Dark Pork Adobo” for your “Mardi Gras” celebration.

By the way, adobo or the Philippine Adobo is a popular Filipino cuisine that involves meat or seafood marinated in vinegar, garlic and sometimes with soy sauce in its cooking process. This dish is best for outings, picnics and campings as well for it wont spoil right away even without refrigeration. The long shelf-life of this viand is due to vinegar which inhibits bacteria growth in the food. Best when eaten with hot cooked rice.

You will need: pork (sliced), vinegar, soy sauce, oyster sauce (optional), vegetable oil or cooking oil, garlic, ginger, onion, laurel leaf, salt or pork cubes and water.

First, in a pot… cook pork in enough amount of water with slices of garlic, onion, ginger and a not too much soy sauce. Cook in medium fire. Let the water dries up as the meat absorbs all the flavors of the spices and the soy sauce. The meat then will produce its own oil.  Keep on frying the pork in that oil ’til it tenders. But, avoid getting it burned. Remove the meat from heat and put it in a bowl.

Now, this is where the real cooking of the “Dark Adobo” takes place. On another pot, heat a small amount of cooking or vegetable oil. Then, saute slices of garlic, onion and ginger in the oil. Afterwards, put the pork and fry it a little in the oil with the sauteed spices followed by putting enough amount of water. Let it boil for a while then add up soy sauce, oyster sauce and vinegar depending on your taste. Put the laurel leaf.  Add a little salt to flavor or much better you can use any pork cubes to alternate with the salt. Simmer and serve hot in a bowl with a hot plate of rice. Have a cola or soda as your beverage to compliment with the slight saltiness of your “Dark Adobo”. Enjoy eating!

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