food moments: DUHAT

duhat

Duhat is a local Philippine fruit which is oval in shape and has a dark purple and almost black in color. It is also referred as Java Plum.

Whenever I am having a taste of this sweet-like fruit, I used to remember how we climbed up to the Duhat tree in the backyard with it spreading branches just to pick and collect more of its one-seeded fruit in a basket when my friends and I were young back in the days. After that, we’re going to put the collected duhat inside a closed container, sprinkle it with rock salt… then slightly shaking it for a while. Grabbing some and enjoying the taste of it with my folks. Others just dip it in rock salt if they don’t want to do the “shaking thing”.

Food isn’t really all about satisfying your tummy but leaving you a lasting memory to laugh about with your friends.

Photo by: Sukito San

food recipe: How to Make “KUNDOL” or WINTER MELON Candy

kundol

A “Kundol” vine growing on my sister’s backyard starts to bear lots of  fruits. We usually pick the young ones and cooked with other vegetable dishes or as a yummy soup that taste a little sweet when eaten. Since it’s plenty, my mom decided to make candies out of the mature ones for a change. Commonly known as “kundol” in the Philippines and popularly heard as one of the vegetables mentioned in a local “Pinoy” folk song “Bahay Kubo”… this fruit vine was known in other English names as winter melon, white gourd or ash gourd. It has a protective white powdery covering on its fruit and you can see and observe that when you touch it. Anyway, here’s how my mother made her “kundol” candies.

INGREDIENTS:

sliced kundol

sliced “kundol” or winter melon

lime

lime

sugar

brown sugar

clean water

PROCEDURES:

peeled kundol

1. Peel off kundol and wash it afterwards.

2. Slice it into halves and remove the seeds in the middle.

3. After removing the seeds, slice the halves into another half and have it diced in small pieces according to your desired shapes.

sliced kundol in lime solution

4. Soak diced kundol overnight in clean water mixed with enough amount of lime solution. The lime will make the kundol candies crunchy enough to munch and to neutralize its taste as well.

5. The next day, remove the soaked kundol from the lime solution using a strainer.

6. In a separate big pot, boil water which is half amount of the pot mixed with brown sugar. The amount of brown sugar that you’re going to add depends on how sweet you want your candies to come out.

diced kundol cooked in water and sugar mixture

7. Next, put diced kundol in a big pot together with the water and sugar solution.

8. Keep on boiling it until the water and sugar solution runs dry or when the kundol completely absorbs the sweetness in the solution.

9. Take a bite and remove it from heat when it’s crunchy and dry enough to be eaten. Cool it down and store in glass containers or candy bowls.

kundol candy

Enjoy eating your dessert and taste its sweetness with your family and friends while watching your favorite movies at home. Happy eating!

Photos by: Sukito San

Recipe by: Prime Bermudez

food news: BIGGEST MOONCAKE in the PHILIPPINES

Mooncake

The biggest Mooncake in the Philippines is now ready to satisfy your cameras and cravings for real! Prepared by “Eng Bee Tin”, a Chinese Deli Store located at # 628 Ongpin Street, Binondo, Manila. The giant mooncake measures 75 inches in circumferencce, 24 inches in diameter, and 3 inches in thickness which can feed and be divided to more than fifty persons. This yummy delicacy is not only for display but 100% edible and made from natural ingredients. The presentation of the eye-catching mooncake was done by “Eng Bee Tin” in preparation for the Mid-Autumn Festival or popularly known as Mooncake Festival for the Filipino-Chinese Community held every September aside from giving-away mooncakes as part of the celebration.  It will be on display until September 22, 2013 at SM Mall of Asia… and will also be on display until September 30, 2013 at Eng Bee Tin’s Binondo branch. Foodtrippers and folks in all walks of life can have their photo taken with the largest mooncake for free and you can take home with you a free mooncake from the mentioned deli store if you had taken your picture with it at their main branch in Binondo.

Mooncakes are made out of mixed flour and sugar, then turned into dough and added with fillings and salted eggs afterwards. Its traditional flavors are ube, pandan, mixed nuts, lotus and mongo. But now, it comes with different taste like choco peanut butter, salted caramel truffle snowskin, and rum raisin truffle snowskin. Moreover, a mooncake is more than just a food but also a part of history as it was used to carry a message of revolution of the Chinese which is the salted egg as its filling during the Civil War.

Happy Mooncake Festival 🙂

Photo Credit: SM Mall of Asia Official Facebook Page

News Source: Bandila ( ABS CBN TV News Program)

food feature: SUGARCANE or “TUBO”

sugarcane

“Sugarcane” commonly known in the Philippines as “Tubo” is native to tropical regions of South Asia and the primary source of sugar around the world aside from sugar beets. Sugar which is extracted from its fibrous and jointed stalks and when fermented can produce ethanol which is the type of alcohol found in alcoholic beverages. Its scientific name is “Saccharum” and was among  in the species and family of tall grasses which is perennial or sturdy enough to survive while being the largest crop that grows 6 up to 19 feet tall. The global demand for sugar reinforces the sugarcane agriculture to be primarily driven into priority. The main product from sugarcane is sucrose which is an organic compound and popularly known as table sugar. Brazil was the biggest producer of sugarcane in the world followed by India, China, Thailand, Pakistan and Mexico. The Philippines is also a sugar-producing country… and sugarcane is widely grown in the islands of Luzon, Mindanao, Negros and Panay. Sugarcane crop is sensitive to the type of soil, irrigation, climate and its harvest period depending on its varieties as well as the fertilizers used in its growing stage.

SUGARCANE  JUICE

tubo

When I was a kid, we were taught to have a taste of sugarcane juice by means of chewing. The stalks were chopped for about 12 inches as the rind was then removed. Next, its internal tissues were bitten then sucked while being chewed and spitting out the pulp afterwards.  Presently, you don’t have to do it the hard way as that. it is now commercially available in malls particularly in “CARICA” stalls, wherein the juice from the sugarcane were naturally extracted with the use of sugarcane machine for cane processing and pressing then placed in a bottle for a more comfortable consumption as a plain beverage without the chewing part. Plus the fact that the said juice is free from any chemicals, artificial food color and flavoring.

sugarcane in mall

Drinking sugarcane juice have many health benefits such as an alternative remedy for sore throat and flu. It’s good for our digestive system which can prevent constipation due to its rich potassium content. It also decreases our body’s bad cholesterol which in return can refresh and energize us. To add up, it can strengthen our stomach, kidney and heart. Best of all, it can help us prevent and fight cancer because of it’s being alkaline in nature. Moreover, it hydrates our body quickly. Regular intake of its juice can naturally boost our immune system, improve our intestinal health, breaks kidney stones and prevents hypertension to name a few. Drinking  a delicious and natural sugarcane juice can give you a healthy and sweet life ahead!

Photos by: Sukito San

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sugarcane

http://www.netafim.com/article/sugarcane–philippines

http://beautyhealthtips.in/best-health-benefits-of-drinking-sugarcane-juice/

food photos: FOOD FOR THE RAINY DAYS

Rainy season is best dealt with eating hot and warm food for comfort while listening to the cluttering sound of raindrops on the rooftop. Enjoy eating!

champorado

“Champorado”

ginataang halo-halo

“Ginataang Halo-Halo”

wanton mami soup

Wanton Mami Soup

sopas

“Sopas”

lugaw o goto

“Lugaw” or “Goto”

hot monay with coffee

Hot “Monay” with Coffee

dried fish with fried rice

“Daing” or Salted Dried Fish with Fried Rice and Vinegar Garlic Dip plus Fresh Tomatoes on the side

salabat

“Salabat”

food recipe: PININYAHANG MANOK

pininyahang manok

“Pininyahang Manok” or Pineapple Chicken is a famous Filipino dish among fiestas, celebrations, and special occasions and even in simple family dinner. It is best served with steamed rice. Here’s how to cook it the easy way!

INGREDIENTS:

1 kg whole chicken, cut into pieces

1 can pineapple chunks with syrup

1/2 cup evaporated milk

2 tbsp vegetable oil

1 head minced garlic

1 piece diced onion

1 piece diced red bell pepper

salt and pepper to taste

PROCEDURE:

1. Season chicken with an enough amount of salt and pepper and sear it in vegetable oil until golden brown. Then, set aside.

2. Sauté onion and garlic in the pan. Add pineapple chunks with its syrup then transfer it to a pot.

3. Add seared chicken, then simmer for 30 minutes.

4. Add diced red bell pepper, then simmer again for 15 minutes.

5. Add evaporated milk, simmer it for a while and season with salt and pepper according to your desired taste. Serve hot.

Photos by: Sukito San

food moment: UBE MACAPUNO ROLL

ube macapuno roll

I am not really into celebrating my birthday in an extravagant way. For me, It’s an enough gift that I’ll always see my family in good health and that we are all living harmoniously. I didn’t expect that my nephew named, Jai Jai, would surprise me by presenting his birthday present to me on my special day. He got near to me as I came home and showed me what’s on the table. It’s an “Ube Macapuno Roll” from Red Ribbon with a written birthday greeting on it and with six little lit candles on top of it plus six faces of smileys made of white icing which adds cuteness to the cake. Of course, he’s just the one who presented it to me. But, it’s actually his parent’s idea to give it to me.

cake blow

Another funny moment that goes along with that cake roll whenever I see one was that as my nephew presented the cake to me, he asked me that he wanted to be the one to blow it for me. By the way, my 5-year old nephew has this habit of blowing candles on any cake he sees. And yup, he did succeed of blowing the six candles on the cake! 

Photos by: Sukito San

food review: CHOWKING’s ORANGE CHICKEN

Chowking's Orange Chicken

One meal included in Chowking restaurant’s menu caught my attention if it really taste good as a food combination.  So, as a certified foodie… I have to try it out!

In one of their restaurant branches, I ordered their “Orange Chicken rice Meal with drink” for one person. They gave me a number in the counter and ask me to wait for it for some few minutes. Well, while waiting for my order… I just observe how their crews move and accommodate their customers. I can say that they were courteous yet fully occupied with some task. Finally, my order was served after 16 minutes of waiting. It’s quite a long wait but excusable because the food was served hot enough to be eaten and with a little apology plus a smile from the service crew who brought me my order. Aside from the fact, that I can see that the lines on their counter were longer and that there’s still many arriving customers.

Here’s my verdict for the food, I didn’t expect that a combination of the light sweetness and slight sourness of the orange taste well with the chicken. The chicken is rightly cooked and tender enough to be chewed. Although, the meal was served with few slices of the chicken meat. But, the sauce in the “Orange Chicken” compliments the chicken meat and the orange carpels and it really tastes good. I have to admit that my taste buds loved it. Moreover, it fits to be a viand on plain rice or even on fried rice… knowing that Filipinos cannot have a complete meal without rice. I’m happy that I’ve tried tasting it. Yup, why would “Chowking” include it on their menu if it’s not yummy. I should say that they’ve added an asset meal on their menu.

All I can say is that, if pineapple goes well with chicken in “Pininyahang Manok“, why not an orange with chicken!

Photo by: Sukito San

food moment: ICE SCRAMBLE a.k.a. “ISKRAMBOL”

iskrambol with chocolate syrup

When I was a kid during my elementary years… one of my favorite food that I usually buy after school that was sold in food carts placed in a styrobox along the street near the entrance of the campus is… the famous “iskrambol”.

“Iskrambol” is a slang term derived from the word “Ice Scramble”, a shortcut street call per sé. It is the Filipino version of slurpee or slushy made of shaved ice and which is usually in bright pink color. Sometimes, This sweet street food is commonly topped with chocolate syrup with sugar caramel and powdered milk.

iskrambol toppings

As time flies, “iskrambol” evolved into something classy and with many choices of toppings aside  from the said syrup. New toppings such as marshmallows, pinipig and colorful candy sprinklers. You can now enjoy it in different colors as well such as yellow, orange and green. Presently, it is already being sold in malls and open for franchising in many brand names to choose from. Definitely a yummy and an affordable treat to beat the heat of the sun.

iskrambol

Until now, eating it or just even looking at it reminds me of my foodtrippin’ fun childhood days!

Photos by: Sukito San

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